Lydia Druin

 

Lydia Druin

I am interested in mammalian carnivore ecology in northern systems. I focus on utilizing non-invasive genetic sampling methods to answer ecological questions about species of conservation concern, and am energized about continued use and development of these methods to aid our understanding of threatened and endangered species across a changing landscape! Incorporating these methods in a landscape genetics framework and investigating the role landscapes play in
range-wide connectivity of species in
recovery is a focus of my research.

I earned my B.Sc. in conservation biology and wildlife ecology at the University of Idaho. There I had opportunities to apply these genetic methods to study the impacts of habitat restoration on Sitka black-tailed deer ecology in southeast Alaska. I also collaborated internationally to develop a country-wide novel landscape genetic assessment of jaguars and pumas in Costa Rica, in addition to a predator-prey ecology evaluation of pumas in the Talamanca region via camera trap surveys.

For my Masters’ research in the Pauli lab, I am contributing to a body of research going back decades on American marten, the only state-listed endangered mammal in Wisconsin. I will be utilizing a database of georeferenced genetic samples across the Great Lakes recovery network to evaluate region-wide functional connectivity and identify dispersal corridors or barriers, especially around the recovery-limited reintroduced population in Chequamegon National Forest. Furthermore, I hope to estimate recruitment in this population and Minnesota, which was a source for individuals translocated to Chequamegon as recently as 2010-2012.

email: druin@wisc.edu